Immediate Impacts

A cancer diagnosis can be a really hard time for anyone. Some people say it is “shocking” and “numbing”. Others say they don’t hear anything else after the word “cancer”. For a First Nations person, there can be more factors that can make the shock even bigger.

“Cancer mean to me is something really dangerous, and you know cancer kills people, so as soon as you hear somebody got cancer already you think of death to the family so it’s really scary.  Had it really badly in Fort Good Hope so you’re living every day thinking of who’s going to be next, it might be you.  So it was really scary and the word cancer is really scary.  And right away if someone, if a nurse or a doctor says someone has cancer right away you think of death, the story gets around really fast in a town.” – Vicki, Fort Good Hope, NT
 
“One thing that came clear from the videos was the long shadow of the residential school program on our Elders and how that impacts of subsequent generations, …  it has made people more hesitant to self-advocate and to interact with what they perceive as authority figures from different systems.” – Dr. Fourier, Terrace, BC
 
Watch and listen to the Storywork and dialogue about communication



Guide: Context
Coming soon.

Guide: Family
 

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